DIAMOND PRINCESS - SEA OF JAPAN EXPLORER FALL FOILAGE

Asia

Inclusions

**Exclusive Inventory**

Cruise package includes:
- 18 night Sea of Japan Explorer Fall Foilage Diamond Princess cruise ex Yokohama return
- Main Meals~ and entertainment onboard
- BONUS US $85 onboard credit per twin, triple or quad cabin^
- Port charges and government fees

Past passengers may be entitled to further discounts by quoting their unique Princess Past Passenger number. Any past passenger discount is at the discretion of Princess Cruises and is subject to withdrawal at any time without notice.

BEST AVAILABLE AIRFARE GUARANTEE - Call us now and talk to one of our Specialist Consultants for today`s Best Available Airfare in combination with this value Cruise Special!

Details

BONUS CREDIT^ Cruise 18 nights with Diamond Princess ex Yokohama return

18 Night cruise sailing roundtrip from Yokohama onboard Diamond Princess.

Diamond Princess is a treasure trove of exceptional delights waiting to be discovered. Dine on freshly prepared sashimi in Kai Sushi, watch street performers in the dazzling Atrium, or take in a lavish production show in our state-of-the-art theater. And for a unique treat visit the Izumi Japanese Bath, the largest of its kind at sea.

Highlights of this cruise:

Tokyo (Yokohama), Japan
Yokohama and Edo began life as sleepy fishing villages. That changed in the early 17th century after Tokugawa Ieyasu became Shogun. Edo became the center of political power in Japan, a position the city retained even after the restoration of Imperial rule in 1866.

Contemporary Tokyo may be the most astonishing city on earth. It's a paradoxical mix of ancient tradition and postmodern culture. The Ginza - an international shopping mecca - stands near the serene grounds of the Imperial Palace, and the hyper-speed of 21st century consumerism is mysteriously reconciled with the elegance and serenity of traditional culture. Tokyo provides the traveler with a dizzying experience.

With the Meiji Restoration of 1868, Edo was renamed Tokyo, the "Eastern Capital," to distinguish it from the old imperial capital at Kyoto, the "Western Capital."

Aomori, Japan
The capital of the Aomori Prefecture in northern Japan, Aomori derives much of its beauty from the apple orchards and cherry blossoms that encompass its landscape and the snow-covered Hakkoda Mountains that look on from a distance. Throughout its history, the city has been stricken with misfortune time and time again - in 1910, a fire destroyed Aomori, and during World War II, the city was left in ruins following an air raid - yet it always prevails.

Aomori is perhaps best known for its renowned Nebuta Festival, an elaborate yearly event in which participants illuminate giant paper representations of samurai warriors, animals, and popular cartoon characters while parading them through the streets.

Sakata, Japan
Sakatais a medium-sized city in Yamagata Prefecture. Sakata is located in the fertile Shonai Plain that is known for its high-quality rice. The city grew as an important stop along the coastal shipping route that connected Hokkaido with Osaka via ports along the Sea of Japan and Seto Inland Sea during the Edo Period.
A local merchant family, the Honma clan, came to dominate trade in the city and accrued a vast fortune that made them wealthier than some of the country's feudal lords. Due to their power and influence, the clan developed close ties with the local lords and had a number of lavish buildings built. Some of these buildings still stand today along with museums and other attractions.

Kanazawa, Japan
Kanazawa, which means "marsh of gold," draws its name from an old legend in which a Japanese peasant, digging for potatoes, found flakes of gold in the ground. Today, gold leaf is a major art form synonymous with the city, and even has a designated museum. A City of Crafts and Folk Art, Kanazawa is also known for its intricate kaga-nui embroidery and delicate kutani porcelain, among other handicrafts, making it a shopper's paradise! There's also no shortage of history in this coastal city. Once boasting geisha houses and a labyrinthine samurai village, the city was built around Kanazawa Castle. Fire destroyed all but a few small 16th-century castle structures - namely the elegant Ishikawa Gate and some watchtowers that have become a focus of many a photograph today. Just outside the castle park blooms the enchanting Kenroku-en Garden, one of the Three Great Gardens of Japan, and the home of the country's oldest fountain.

Sakaiminato, Japan
Wedged between sea, sky and mountains, this small fishing port has been esteemed for centuries for its superb seafood. Here, the Sea of Japan yields up both crab and hon-maguro, the prized Bluefin tuna esteemed by gourmets around the world. Sakaiminato is also your gateway to a very ancient region of Honshu. West of the city lies Izumo-taisha, one of the oldest and holiest shrines in Shinto. This area is dotted with burial mounds from Japan's Bronze Age. The town of Matsue boasts the celebrated "Black Castle," a six-story, black-walled castle that home to a clan of the mighty Tokugawa dynasty that ruled Japan for over 250 years. And to the east rises the great snow-capped summit of Mt. Daisen, considered one of the four most scenic mountains in all Japan.

Also a common sight ashore are the Yokai - approximately 100 bronze statues of supernatural characters as imagined by famed manga comic author Shigeru Mizuki, who was born in Sakaiminato. The Yokai have become synonymous with the town and delight visitors at every turn.

Busan, South Korea
The second largest city in South Korea, Busan is your gateway to a fascinating land whose culture is a unique amalgam of old and new. Modern high-rise towers dwarf ancient Buddhist temples. The city's bustling business district offers a stark contrast to the serene grounds of Yongdusan Park. In short, Busan is a microcosm of South Korea, a nation whose startling economic success often obscures one of Asia's most sophisticated and venerable cultures.

Busan was the scene of bitter fighting during the Korean War. The United Nations Memorial Cemetery marks the final resting place for the troops from 16 nations who gave their lives during the conflict.

Kagoshima, Japan
From the 12th century to the Meiji Restoration of 1868, Kagoshima was the chief stronghold of the mighty Shimazu clan. The city lies at the top of the Satsuma Peninsula, a mountainous, geothermal wonderland of hot springs and geysers. The area is also rich in modern Japanese history: Saigo Takamori and the Satsuma samurai were leaders of the Meiji Restoration that toppled the shogun and restored the Emperor to power in 1868. In 1877, dissatisfied with the direction of the new government, Saigo led the Satsuma Rebellion, which ended in his death and the final defeat of the samurai.

The symbol of Kagoshima is Sakura Jima - the volcanic island that sits just offshore. The volcano has erupted over 30 times in recorded history.

Shimizu (for Mt. Fuji), Japan
A mesmerizing landscape, a revered cultural history, and Japan's most sacred volcano are just a few of the many delights beckoning you to come and explore this ancient city. While Shimizu may have the reputation as being bustling and modern, its cultural and spiritual side is on display in the form of ancient and enthralling shrines. Of course, it may be the sacred and snow-capped Mount Fuji that garners the most attention. Towering over the region at approximately 12,388 feet above sea level, the active volcano, designated a "place and source of artistic inspiration" by UNESCO is just one of the many unforgettable adventures Shimizu inspires.

Osaka (for Kyoto), Japan
For centuries, Osaka was Japan's cultural and commercial gateway to Asia - the point of entry both for trade goods and, most importantly, cultural influences that shaped Japanese society. From tea to Zen, from art to science and philosophy, Osaka was Japan's contact with the great East Asian cultures that flourished in China and Korea. The city reached its zenith in the late 16th century, when the great feudal lord Toyotomi Hideyoshi made Osaka his capital. Toyotomi was master of Japan, and an immense administrative and commercial center rapidly developed around Osaka Castle. After Toyotomi's death, the nation's seat of power shifted from Osaka to a sleepy little fishing village called Edo - modern Tokyo. While overshadowed by Tokyo, Osaka remains Japan's second largest city and a vital commercial center.

Modern Osaka is home to monuments from Japan's past including Toyotomi's immense castle and the Sumiyoshi Shrine. The city is also your gateway to Kyoto, Japan's ancient imperial capital and the nation's cultural and spiritual center.

Kochi, Japan
Kochi sits on the broad alluvial plain facing Urado Bay. This city in Shikoku takes its name from the great feudal castle that sits at its very heart. Completed in 1611, Kochi Castle was the seat of Yamauchi Kazutoyo, a noted warrior who supported Tokugawa Ieyasu in his successful quest to become Shogun. Tosa Province and Kochi Castle were Yamauchi's reward for faithful service. There is an historical irony here: 250 years later, a Kochi native son - a former low-ranked samurai and now ronin named Sakamoto Ryoma - played a pivotal role in bringing the Tokugawa Shogunate to an end and restoring the Emperor of Japan to political prominence. The prize once awarded for faithful service had become a hotbed of support for the Meiji Restoration.

Kochi is one of the wettest places in Japan - and a frequent target for cyclonic storms or typhoons. Southeast of the city, warm oceans currents washing against the Aki Mountains create a subtropical landscape of hibiscus, palm and ficus at Muroto-Anan Quasi-National Park.

Hiroshima, Japan
On August 6, 1945, human history was irrevocably altered when the American bomber Enola Gay dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima. The bomb was code-named "Little Boy," but its detonation left half the city in ruins and aflame. Today, Hiroshima is a monument not only to the destructive forces harnessed by men but also to the indomitable will of the human spirit to overcome tragedy. At the heart of the city lies Peace Memorial Park and the Atomic Bomb Dome. The gutted walls of the city's old Industry Promotion Hall and the skeletal frame that supported its copper dome, vaporized in the blast, are instantly recognizable symbols of Hiroshima.

Travelers to Hiroshima will discover a more serene note at nearby Miyajima Island. One of the top-three scenic spots of Japan, the island is home to ancient Itsukushima Shrine, a designated National Treasure.

Please select your cabin type to enquire

Pricing (per person)

  • All (4)
Twin

Inside

AU $4,669

Outside

AU $4,959

Balcony

AU $6,699

Suite

AU $8,599

Terms & Conditions

*Conditions Apply: Prices are per person, capacity controlled and listed in Australian dollars twin share including port taxes. Prices may fluctuate if surcharges, fees, taxes or currency change, and may be withdrawn at any time. Prices shown here are not shown in real time. While we endeavour to keep our pricing as up-to-date as possible, the advertised prices shown here may differ from the live prices in our booking system. The prices shown are for a cash payment. Credit card fees of up to 2.5% will apply. Offer subject to live availability at time of booking. Prices are per person twin share based on best available cruise fare, inclusive of all discounts unless otherwise stated. All offers are capacity controlled and can be withdrawn or modified at any time without notice and subject to availability at time of booking. Outside and Balcony cabins may have obstructed views and Suite cabins comprises Junior Suites, Mini Suites and any other type of suite that represents the best value for each cruise. Unless otherwise stated, onboard gratuities are NOT included. ~Specialty restaurants may incur a surcharge. ^Bonus Credit is in US Dollars, a total per twin cabin and is non-transferrable and non-refundable. Onboard credit cannot be used at the medical centre or casino. All unused on board credit is forfeit on final night. Bonus Onboard Credit offer is subject to the discretion of Princess Cruises and may be withdrawn at any time without prior notice. To be read in conjunction with the Princess Passage Contract available at princess.com/legal/passage_contract/ which passengers will be bound by. All passports, vaccinations and visas are the responsibility of the travelling guest to secure prior to departure from Australia. Some cruise lines reserve the right to impose a fuel levy if the NMEX price reaches a certain level - please check with your consultant at time of booking. Cruise deposit, amendment and cancellation conditions apply. Travel agent service fees not included. Special conditions apply - please ask for full details at time of enquiry. Offer ends 08Oct21 or until sold out/withdrawn from sale. Please note only residents with an Australian address are eligible to book Australian rates in Australian dollars. This cruise package is provided by Seven Oceans Cruising, please ask your travel agent to contact us for more information